The Presentation

The Basics

You will need to create a presentation using Prezi, PowerPoint, Google Slides or some other presentation software (I’m open, but check with me before you get started).

You will present the information from your paper, and importantly, leave your audience with an action piece—to change the way they think or the way they behave.

Some Advice

First let’s check out 3 Tips for Presenting to an Unfamiliar Audience.

On Style & Format

We’re going to use TED talks as a model for the “look” and “feel” of the presentation.

Let’s begin to explore this format with Adora Svitak’s TED talk: What Adults Can Learn from Kids

Explore other TED talks, especially by kids your age and/or in your subject area.

Ready?

When you are ready, begin to craft your presentation.

  • Start with a question
    • Start your presentation with a question that will allow your audience to think about how they feel about your topic.
  • Jewish Connection
    • Be sure to mention your connection to Jewish thought.
  • End with Action
    • Finish your presentation with a “call to action” that asks your audience to make some change in their thinking or behavior as a result of what they learned from your presentation.

Remember to share your presentation with me (eebersole@sha613.org) so that I can comment/make recommendations.

Homework Reminder

  1. Seminar Final Draft due Friday, 5/6
  2. Seminar Presentation Final Draft due 5/13
  3. Seminar Presentation Event: Wednesday, 5/18 (evening @SHA)

The Paper: Final Draft

Here are some general observations:

  • Make sure you have a title
  • Make sure you have a paragraph that connects your topic to Jewish thought/teachings and (if possible) Israel
    • Ask a classmate, me, or a Rabbi for advice
    • Cite your source!
  • Triple check your in-text citations
    • No plagiarism!
    • Match citations in Works Cited
  • Triple check your Works Cited
    • Separate, last page of your document
    • All in-text citations accounted for
  • Read your paper as many times as humanly possible (and out loud after each revision)
  • Have at least one other person read your paper (your best friend will read it out loud to you)

Homework Reminder

  1. Seminar Final Draft due Friday, 5/6
  2. Seminar Presentation Final Draft due 5/13
  3. Seminar Presentation Event: Wednesday, 5/18 (evening @SHA)

The Paper: In-Text Citations and Works Cited

The Research Paper

Where you should be:

  1. Reading sources (internet and print) and marking passages that you can cite in your paper
  2. Creating an outline (see previous post: Ready, Set, Write: The Outline)
  3. Adding source material to your outline
  4. Beginning to write your paper (embedding passages from your sources with your own thoughts)
  5. Using in-text citations as your write your paper & creating a works cited page

Let’s read through our example research paper: Social Networking: How and Why It Improves Interpersonal Communication

Works Cited

You will need to use in-text citations to credit your sources within your paper.

At the end of your paper, you will need to provide detailed information about your sources: a works cited page.

A comprehensive guide to MLA citations: Purdue OWL: MLA

Luckily, there is an online resource that will guide you through the process: EasyBib.

Homework Reminder

  1. Renew your Seattle Public Library books! (many of you did this in class yesterday)
  2. Continue to write your outline and/or paper
    1. Continue to read your sources (internet and print) and mark passages that you can cite in your paper
    2. Add source material to your outline
    3. Begin to write your paper (use in-text citations)
    4. Create a works cited page

Ready, Set, Write: The Outline

First, let’s talk about plagiarism.

Take this short quiz: What is Plagiarism?

Infographic: Did I plagiarize?

Infographic_CanIUseThatPicture4

Now, let’s look at a model research paper: Social Networking: How and Why It Improves Interpersonal Communication

So… How did the author of this paper arrive at this polished final product?

  1. Use an outline!
  2. Eventually, we’ll talk about a works cited page. But for now, just focus on:
    1. Creating an outline (here is one in MS Word that you can resave and use as a guide: Blank Outline)
    2. Cataloguing the information from your research under the appropriate outline headings
    3. Beginning to write your paper by embedding the information from your research in writing that represents your own thoughts.

Homework Reminder

  1. Info about at least three (3) books about your topic that you will take out from the SPL or KCLS library, due Monday, January 5.

Develop an Essential Question & Need to Knows

Essential Question

An Essential Question will help you to organize your thoughts and direct your research.

An essential question frames a topic as a problem to be solved. It should connect your lived experiences and interests (your only resources for learning something new) to disciplinary problems in the world. And it should connect what you learn back to the real world, where you can put their new understandings to work.

A good essential question:

  1. is interesting and compelling to you and your audience right now!
  2. invites you and your audience into the ongoing disciplinary debates and conversations that create knowledge in the first place.
  3. requires you and your audience to learn—and to use—the same understandings and strategies as the real experts in the field.

An essential question does not:

  • simply regurgitate already available information
  • have a simple “yes” or “no” answer

Think about your topic, what questions do you have? How can you frame these into an essential question?

Here are some model essential questions:

Social Problems/Health
  • Who is hungry and what are the effects of hunger?
  • What does it mean to be healthy?
Language Arts
  • What is courage?
  • What is a good relationship?
Science
  • Why do organisms die?
  • How are we like bacteria?
History/Cultural Values
  • Who  was/is a great person? A great leader?
  • Who gets power and why?
Math
  • What is measurable?
  • To what degree are numbers real?

Media/Technology

  • How does (insert technology tool and the outcome for the audience/user)…
  • How should (insert technology tool and the outcome for the audience/user)…

Information adapted from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/essential-questions

Need to Knows

Need to Knows are the specific questions you will need to answer to find out more information about your topic. They will form the framework of your essay.

A good need to know:

  1. focuses on one main aspect of your topic
  2. results in information that will inform you and your audience about that aspect and yields useful anecdotes or statistics
  3. requires you and your audience to learn—and to use—the information to develop their understanding about your topic

An essential question does not:

  • simply regurgitate already available information
  • have a simple “yes” or “no” answer

Researching Your Topic: Library Databases, Google Searches & Diigo

Today, we’re going to explore an online research management tools:

First, let’s check out what Becky Todd has put together for us in Libguides:

http://sha613.libguides.com/beharlibrary

And then, there’s Diigo.

Now, let’s play with this new tool.

  1. Go to Diigo and sign up for a free account.
  2. From your account, add the Diigolet to your bookmarks bar.
  3. Go to the SPL or KCLS sites and find an article about your topic.
  4. Use the Diigolet to highlight, add sticky notes, and add an article about your topic to your Diigo library.
  5. Check out your article in your Diigo library.

Ready, Set, Write: The Paper

Once you have an outline, you are ready to fill in the details that will become the rough draft of your paper.

  1. Catalogue the information from your research under the appropriate outline headings
    1. Remember to include the source in-text citation info (website name/author name + page number) after info that comes from sources!
  2. Write your own thoughts in outline points above and below your source information (see Outline with Embedded Source Info and Thoughts)
  3. Embed the information from your research in writing that represents your own thoughts

Here is an example of an outline with source info and personal thoughts embedded: Sample Outline with Embedded Sources and Thoughts

Homework Reminder

  1. Renew your Seattle Public Library books!
  2. Continue to write your outline and/or paper
    1. Continue to read your sources (internet and print) and mark passages that you can cite in your paper
    2. Add source material to your outline
    3. Begin to write your paper (use in-text citations)
    4. Create a works cited page
  3. Seminar Paper Rough Draft due Friday, 3/4

Choose a Topic

First things first…

You need to decide on a topic. This should be a topic that interests you in a “need to know” kind of way.

Your topic should be:

  1. Current
  2. Able to be connected to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)
  3. Able to be connected to the state of Israel or Jewish thought.

Don’t worry if you don’t already have an idea about this. There is time to “issue shop”.

Issue Shopping

  1. Take out your Library Card.
  2. Go to the Seattle Public Library database: Opposing Viewpoints in Context – an online library of current event topics, with facts and arguments for and against.
    • To access it, go to SPL’s list of databases and scroll down to Opposing Viewpoints in Context. You need a library card to actually access the database.

Or, check out these cool current events articles I found in the New York Times & on NPR:

Essential Question

Once you have a topic, you’re ready to develop an Essential Question & three “need to knows”. We’ll talk more about this after you choose a topic.

Homework Reminder

  1. Get a King County Library or Seattle Public Library card by Monday, 10/6.